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2018
06-11-2018, 12:29 PM (This post was last modified: 06-11-2018 12:33 PM by admin.)
Post: #1
2018
Amid arranging his prom date, lacrosse practice and getting homework done, teenager Cole Mattox launched a hedge fund out of his bedroom in suburban Montclair, New Jersey. Mattox founded North Tabor Capital in March 2017 when he was 17 years old. Now, Mattox is 18, graduating from Seton Hall Preparatory School and headed to University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business undergraduate program in the fall.

Teen launched North Tabor Capital hedge fund from his NJ bedroom

Walking at an average pace was linked to a 20% reduction in the risk of mortality compared with walking at a slow pace, while walking at a brisk or fast pace was associated with a risk reduction of 24%, according to a new study. A similar result was found for risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. It’s not too late to start. In fact, the benefits were far more dramatic for older walkers. Average pace walkers aged 60 years or over experienced a 46% reduction in risk of death from cardiovascular causes, and fast pace walkers a 53% risk reduction, the study found... A recent Harvard University study concluded that you could add 10 years to your life by following five habits: eating a healthy diet, exercising 30 minutes or more a day, maintaining a healthy weight — a body mass index between 18.5 and 24.9 — never smoking and drinking only a moderate amount of alcohol.

Scientists from 5 universities say doing this one thing faster could add years to your life - MarketWatch

A woman with advanced breast cancer which had spread around her body has been completely cleared of the disease by a groundbreaking therapy that harnessed the power of her immune system to fight the tumours. It is the first time that a patient with late-stage breast cancer has been successfully treated by a form of immunotherapy that uses the patient’s own immune cells to find and destroy cancer cells that have formed in the body.

Doctors hail world first as woman’s advanced breast cancer is eradicated | Science | The Guardian

Adam and Raquel Gonzales had been together for five years when he woke up one morning with no idea who she was - he had lost all memory of marrying her. But Raquel was determined to win him over again.

'I woke up and didn't recognise my wife' - BBC News

Alongside this study have come disturbing reports of the alcohol industry’s involvement in funding science that may have helped drinking look more favorable, as well as a growing worry that many people are naive about alcohol’s health effects. How many people know, for example, that as far back as 1988, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer designated alcohol a level-one carcinogenSome say too few.. A couple of drinks a day aren’t bad for you and may even be good for you. Right?That’s been the message — from researchers, governments, and beverage companies — for decades. And as a result, many of us don’t think twice about tossing back a couple of glasses or wine or a few beers after work.
But maybe we should. Because it turns out the story about the health effects of moderate drinking is shifting pretty dramatically. New research on alcohol and mortality, and a growing awareness about the rise in alcohol-related deaths in the US, is causing a reckoning among researchers about even moderate levels of alcohol consumption. In particular, an impressive new meta-study involving 600,000 participants, published recently in The Lancet, suggests that levels of alcohol previously thought to be relatively harmless are linked with an earlier death. What’s more, drinking small amounts of alcohol may not carry all the long-touted protective effects on the cardiovascular system.

How much alcohol is too much? The science is shifting. - Vox

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07-10-2018, 09:10 AM
Post: #2
RE: 2018
It could be just the thing for those who need a nudge to start ticking items off their bucket list; scientists have developed a blood test that reveals how long a person has left to live. The test draws on nine biomarkers found in the blood that can be used to calculate the biological age of a person’s body – that is, how old it seems from the way it functions, as opposed to how long it has been out of the womb. Researchers at Yale University in Connecticut found that the test was a more accurate predictor of life expectancy than a person’s chronological age or any of the biomarkers individually.

Is the end nigh?: new blood tests can reveal your life expectancy | Society | The Guardian

It’s considered an inescapable fact of life: the older you get, the more likely death becomes. But new research suggests that the chances of dying may level off – at least for those who make it to 105 years old. The study found that death rates, which rise exponentially in adulthood, begin to decelerate after 80 years old and appear to eventually plateau, or even decline slightly, after the age of 105. By that point, the chances of passing away in a given year are approximately 50-50.

Age 105? Then you've a better chance of living even longer | Science | The Guardian

Over the past two decades, scientists have been studying its properties and believe lupin will now have its time in the sun. "Lupin flakes have a unique combination of low-carb, gluten-free, plant-based protein and prebiotic fibres, with high levels of bioavailable essential amino acids and minerals," explains Sofi Sipsa, chief scientist for Revolupin Flakes, one of the leading manufacturers.  Sipsa, who has been studying lupin for over 20 years and has helped develop the flakes, says these properties make lupin "ideal for improving health issues arising from today's modern diet, such as diabesity, hypertension, gut health and cardiovascular health.

Lupin is the latest health-food craze – but what is it and how much of it should you eat?

Making matters worse, as the World Health Organisation points out, “Women and children often lack power to negotiate smoke-free spaces, including in their homes.” Secondhand smoke increases the chance of a non-smoker getting lung cancer by 20-30% and causes 430,000 deaths worldwide each year – 64% of which are women.

BBC - Future - Why non-smokers are getting lung cancer

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